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. the longer this goes on, the bigger that challenge is. >> is your warning for u.s. action or action in conjunction? >> the secretary is urgently meeting with russian representatives and lots of elements of the state department are meeting with our alies. the potential for recognition of the new syrian national council is something we would be doing, a step our alies have taken. i commend ambassador ford for their leadership on the plementic side to deal with this grinding, painful, two-year-long conflict. the differences are far less important than the commonality, which the president has made a clear declaration, which we will back. thank you. captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> you are going to hear from senator leiberman at the foundation for defense of democracy. they are hosting a forum called "dictators and dissidents." we'll take you live to the event with remarks from incoming chairman ed royce and senator bob casey and talking about syria and tensions in iran coming up in a few minutes. we will b
the justice component of many of these islamist parties. this is a response today corruption of these u.s.- sponsored regimes. -- to the corruption of these u.s.-sponsored regimes. for the record, i am against corruption. >> it goes back to the point at bottom made in my remarks that islamists did not win, the non- islamists lost. they lose by screwing up the delivery of services, by being so corrupt, by being ossified. islamists are there, waiting to take advantage of whatever opportunity, through violence or nonviolence. we did not even discuss their relationship with violence and nonviolence, which is a very important issue. they are there like vultures to reap the benefits, the carrion of these regimes. we can build, and we can help them, help the alternatives build better alternatives. >> question in the far corner over there. >> i am with the center for national policy. thank you for the debate. my point here is that there's been a suggestion that once islamists come to power, they will not give up power. i hear going to have some sort of a renewed dictatorship in the middle east. g
with the u.s. think you, i yield back. >> mr. affleck, i think you have raised a central issue, the lack of security among the population. right now we are relying upon congolese government to provide as security. in afghanistan, we've got a questionable partner in the karzai government. that has been difficult. we have a less than credible partner in the congolese government. in afghanistan, we have gone through these stabilization operations as an alternative way to provide security at the local level with the villages, communities, whereby we have been providing some arms and training to the local population there so that they can provide their own security. obviously, the karzai government has been opposed to that. are there any opportunities for any alternative strategies, given the nature of the in theese government any d drc, mr. affleck? >> i will yield to an expert fellow panelist year, but one of the -- the basic issue, and one that will go a long way and that i alluded to earlier, climbing some influence to president -- are applying some influence to president kabila so that p
view threaten u.s. interests in africa and require the attention of the government and the world. that's why we convened the hearing to assess and a path forward and stabilize the situation and to address ongoing humanitarian needs. i would like to welcome my friend and partner on the subcommittee senator ikesson and i understand we may well be joined by others and to thank our distinguished witnesses for sharing their insight and expertise. earlier this year, a security and political vacuum was exploited by extremists. today al qaeda and aqim and two affiliated groups control the majority of northern malli an area roughly the size of the state of texas making it the largest territory controlled by islamist extremists in the world. i am concerned the current approach is not comprehensive and forward leaning enough to address all threeze crises, security and plit and humanitarian. today we'll examine the policies. we'll assess evolving plans for a regionly led multilateral intervention and consider the complimentry goals of encouraging elections and restoring security by reclaiming the
of any immigration program to the u.s., whether it is a vis the program are refugee program for student visitor program. we have striven over the years to be in the forefront of cooperation and collaboration with law enforcement and national intelligence communities. we know that the program is impervious, and we have tried our best to be forward leaning and ready to innovate and to learn from our experience in order to adopt the best protocols that we can. >> dilma. any closing comment? >> a brief one. thank you for your interest in the security screening process is. i would also like to say that the security screening process not only protect the u.s. but also the program and allows this country to provide ongoing protection to refugees who are in need. we thank you for your interest. >> but we conclude the hearing with the same observation i made at the outset, which is to thank you for the work that you on a very challenging issue in which we balance the interests we have in the continuing to be the nation of refuge for those who we can include while at the same time appreciating th
think it was on friday -- in which unnamed u.s. officials were suggesting that morsi might have learned from the last couple of weeks that winner take all is not the way to go and that he needs to reach out to his political opponents. do you think that the brotherhood understands this referendum as in part a referendum on the way it's running politics in egypt? >> to some extent yes, but i think there's a bigger problem here. the brotherhood is in full existential mode. they're extremely paranoid. they believe that opposition is out to destroy them. they think liberals are anti- democratic and are out to bring down who they view to be elected and legitimately elected president. so they're very much in that mode of thinking. and that's why essentially one of their justifications for the authoritarian november 22 decree is -- and brotherhood leaders actually told me this -- is yes, we know it looks bad, we know it's kind of anti- democratic, but the normal rules of politics are suspended until future notice because we are in this fundamental turning point, and this is what we have to do.
to go to brazil six months ago, if you told me the u.s. had just run faster, -- grown faster, 2.7%, we're expecting the u.s. economy to grow to%. the reason i raise this is to go down there and talk to policy makers and business people. we could have more taxes here, more regulation there. a little more cost of labor here. and a fair amount of uncertainty and take on one of the great economic miracles. they understand this thing they have a great economy growing rapidly is fragile and requires government to facilitate rather than later uncertainty. that is almost like a test tube of forcing. we had a time in which we had a huge amount of uncertainty. comes from -- some comes from government action. we had an aggressive regulatory agenda. we have not made a certain investments we have made. you add that up and you have a period in which businesses are operating under huge weight. creates the conditions under which businesses can operate in intellectual freedom. among the things government can do is create the conditions under which cost [no audio] to allow businesses to innovate. >> one
later, we will discuss the recent increase in u.s. manufacturing. we will also take your calls, e- mails and tweets. "washington journal" is next. host: good morning, it's wednesday, december 19, 2012. the white house has thrown its support behind several gun- control measures on tuesday in the wake of the shooting rampage in newtown, connecticut. a state department inquiry into the september 11 terror attack in benghazi, libya, criticized the agency harshly for inadequate security that -- but specificrecommend signi individuals. and we begin today in on the details of john boehner's plan to avoid the fiscal cliff. we want to hear from you. how optimistic are you that a compromise can still be reached before the end of the year? give us a call -- and you can get up with us on all your social media web sites on facebook and twitter, or e- mail us. a very good morning to you. i want to take you to the lead story in today's washington post. that was today's washington post. here's the headlines from "politico" today. i want to take you to speaker john boehner's comments on the state
to corporate employees. foreign hackers constantly target u.s. companies in such ways in order to get every piece of competitive intelligence information they can. we simply cannot allow this to continue to happen. in response to this growing threat in our 2011 annual report, the u.s. intellectual property coordinator called upon congress to increase the penalties for economic espionage and this bill is consistent with that recommendation. i would like to commend the members of both sides of the aisle for their work on this bill, particularly the gentleman from texas, the chair of the committee, mr. smith, the ranking member, the gentleman from michigan, mr. conyers, the incoming chair of the judiciary committee, my colleague from virginia, mr. goodlatte and the gentleman from north carolina, mr. watt, who worked diligently on this bill and i recognize the leadership of senator lay high and i -- leahy. and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is -- the gentleman from texas -- mr. scott: i yield ba
carrier strike group, he led a task forces in support operation iraqi freedom. he had commanded the u.s. -- the nato allied joint command in lisbon. his tours include service on the fleet force command, joint forces command and the j5 and executive assistant to the vice- chairman of naval operations. he commanded the north american aerospace defense command norad and u.s. northern command before selected as the vice-chairman of the authorities of staff. admiral winnefeld is a highly decorated leader. please welcome the vice-chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral sandy winnefeld. >> good afternoon, everybody. general, to keep that introduction. distinguished guest -- thank you for that introduction. distinguished guests, what an honor it is to be with you here today and to stand in front of these world war ii veterans. as i was listening to that rendition of america the beautiful, it struck me what a wonderful idea america is and what america -- a wonderful place america is and all of you fought for her and we deeply appreciate what you did for us. we will never forget. colonel,
is the september 11 tax on the u.s. mission and an x in benghazi. -- attacks on the u.s. mission and annex in benghazi. three other officials were placed on administrative leave. it may or may not be disciplined. are you satisfied that the investigation is done? >> the most important thing is not whether or not the president called it a terrorist attack or anything like that. the most important thing is to nsure that no, benghazi's happen in the future. there were plenty of mistakes to report. in the future, that the coordination is better and we do not make the same mistakes. that is the most important thing. it was a mistake for mitt romney to use this as a political thing during the campaign. i think foreign policy should be bipartisan to the extent that is possible, and in a time of tragedy, americans need to rally around -- rally together and not try to use it for political, partisan purposes. we need to dissect it, see what happened and make sure it never happens again. there were recommendations that were made, and secretary clinton accepts all of them. we have to make sure that our
to be played out where the u.s.' cooperation re-- creates resentment. it gives this very strange dynamic and insight into the impact that history is having into that area because this is part of the world that has been used to coming and going and create a relationship and hedge their bet. apart from the human tragedies that are in there, your heart breaks. and spoke to his wife right before he went on this mission and died in a helicopter crash and it reminds you of the human cost of this effort and logistical challenges of the effort. >> did this book make you regret or an approach on afghanistan? >> it reminds us of the challenges of it. at the end of the day, afghanistan is important and important for multiple reasons. you don't want to create a safe haven in afghanistan for people to be able to come back and reconstitute the taliban. but it's also about pakistan. to an unstable afghanistan where elements are organized is a danger to pakistan and its nuclear capability and they are concerned about that as well. the raid against bin laden couldn't have happened. the future matters in
just how nonlife- u.s. unemployment benefits are. a lot of the against -- non- lavish u.s. unemployment benefits are. the two countries that he mentioned, the netherlands and belgium, they're doing much better than other continental european countries. the scandinavian countries have guest: there is not this simple relationship that have been extensive unemployment insurance system and you mechanically generate a higher unemployment rate. host: lisa from dallas, texas, received unemployment insurance -- nate from dallas, texas, receives unemployment insurance. caller: right now i lost my job because my boss was fired from the university. and recently got my doctoral degree from that university, and i am spending eight hours a day on the computer, trying to network. i want to buck the contention that it is a mismatch of skills between the employer and the people that are unemployed. there was a recent "wall street journal" saying that part of the problem is how employers conduct searches of candidates, and her recruiting is done. -- how recruiting is done. i think the unemployment benefi
the u.s. capitol's christmas tree, a majestic 73-foot spruce from colorado's white river national forest. [cheers and applause] >> and in keeping with tradition, the speaker of the house, the honorable john boehner, will extend his holiday greetings to you and officially light this remarkable tree in a few moments. but before we get to that big moment, i'd like to welcome members of congress and distinguished guests, our capitol hill neighbors and those of you who are visiting our nation's capital. thank you for joining us this evening. i would like to acknowledge members of the colorado delegation in attendance this evening including senator mark udall, senator michael bennett, congressman scott tipton as well as former senator ben nighthorse campbell. [cheers and applause] >> and senator campbell, of course, drove that tree 5,500 miles to washington dis-- d.c. [cheers and applause] >> now this incredibly beautiful tree has been decorated with ornaments crafted by colorado residents which reflect the theme celebrating our great outdoors. and speaking of ornaments, the u.s. capitol histo
's give them a hand, ladies and gentlemen. [applause] >> and behind me stands the u.s. capitol's christmas tree, a majestic 73-foot spruce from colorado's white river national forest. [cheers and applause] >> and in keeping with tradition, the speaker of the house, the honorable john boehner, will extend his holiday greetings to you and officially light this remarkable tree in a few moments. but before we get to that big moment, i'd like to welcome members of congress and distinguished guests, our capitol hill neighbors and those of you who are visiting our nation's capital. thank you for joining us this evening. i would like to acknowledge members of the colorado delegation in attendance this evening including senator mark udall, senator michael bennett, congressman scott tipton as well as former senator ben nighthorse campbell. [cheers and applause] >> and senator campbell, of course, drove that tree 5,500 miles to washington dis-- d.c. [cheers and applause] >> now this incredibly beautiful tree has been decorated with ornaments crafted by colorado residents which reflect the theme celeb
of skilled workers coming from our country, u.s. schools, u.s. workforces. that is the skills contact at the country could easily get behind and support. that is highly important as we think of the skills issue going forward. some of the issues i heard talked about before critical to that as well. what are we doing in the pipeline? what are we doing from the earliest ages to make sure that under-represented groups are taking to science? why do we have to drop off at middle school around young women? what are the long-term strategy is? we have to attack this on all cylinders and have and all of the above the strategy. but while we are doing the long- term strategy to have a bit of supply of stem and high skilled workers, we should not take our eye off what we can do in the short term. one of the most powerful statistics that came out of the president's science and technology council was the idea that you could have a significant effect on the number of workers we had if you just ensured that you had a higher graduation rate among those who declared a stem major in their freshman year.
for calling. a live picture of the u.s. capitol. 7:23 in washington. some heavy rain and perhaps some snow. a. when terry mix are expecting in town. we mention that because the president is heading back into town. the senate and white house -- the senate and house are due back tomorrow. this is an politico. there is another piece of this morning that says the house member elect is also interested in the peak in the seat -- adapter the seat. springfield, va., lewis, an independent. caller: good morning. you could consider me a little bit pessimistic. i am actually looking at it as realistically as possible. i have a degree in macroeconomics. i believe that they all should be -- we should institute term limits on all of them. maybe a six-year term limit. they're all thinking of reelection. host: both sides? caller: yes. they are thinking about re- election with the country is almost $70 trillion in debt. -- $17 trillion. people and businesses are giving out payouts because taxes are going up on everyone. it does not matter -- there are too many taxes going up. payroll taxes going up. we do not
to the state department report on the september 11 attack of the u.s. consulate report -- consulate in libya that killed four americans. diplomats will speak to reporters about the report. >> on "washington journal" we will focus on gun-control issues with john yarmuth. tim helskamp will join us to talk about the fiscal cliff. and we will look at what options the administration has to tighten gun control laws with or without congressional action. our guest will be david ingram, responded for reuters. live on c-span every day at 7:00 eastern. two committees are holding hearings today on the attack in libya that killed four americans. the senate foreign relations committee will hear from deputy secretary of state at 8:00 eastern. you can see that live on c-span to. mr. burns will go to the other side of the capital of the afternoon to testify before the house foreign affairs committee about the report. that is live on c-span3 at 1:00 eastern. >> our first experience was to come and a different way than every other family up here. probably would never happen again in history. after dad was swor
. . this is where the u.s. needs to stand firm. it's how we can stand firm for freedom. i encourage the passage of this resolution, and i encourage that we as a body will continue to stand for a free and open internet. and with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the question is will the house suspend the rules and agree to senate concurrent resolution 50. as many as are in favor will signify by saying aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair -- black plaque mr. speaker, i ask for a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the concurrent resolution is agreed to -- mrs. blackburn: i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20 and the chair's prior announcement, further proceedings on this motion will
examples in the u.s. may be, i think we all it to the chinese reformers -- owe to the chinese reformers to familiarize them with other possibilities. prior to the financial crisis of 2008 and still to some degree today, many chinese reformers have focused chiefly on the u.s. to the exclusion of other models, drawn by our power as much as our ideals and ideas. i think it is more in power when to our chinese friends -- empowering to our chinese friends to lay out a broader array of possibilities. our chinese friends can see a range of possibilities and see what our universal ideals in promoting human dignity in a range of human institutional designed to get us there so they can craft something that is true to those ideals, but reflective of chinese society. just by way of example, six years ago, our harvard law school project worked with two chinese partner institutions and did the first conference ever in china's history on disability rights. we drew experts from an array of different countries, many of them individuals with disabilities. each of them discussed the models of his or her c
-- but it is happening. but you would take note and stop to think about it anymore. >> 2012 here in the u.s. gave us a glimpse of the sort of future that is in store if we do not do something to avert -- if we don't shift away from business as usual. we saw record temperatures last summer. we saw record drought for large for the country. in colorado, that came together with record fuel. because of the pine bark beetle infestation, due to record warm winters, it was literally a perfect storm of macroclimate's and assesses the came together to bring this wildfire. we saw american storm. and hurricane. it broke previous records and flooding in new york city. and there's certainly a climate change in the sense that, from the 13 -- at least 1 foot of that would have saved lives. that is the difference between a bad and a disastrous flooding event. that storm was sitting over near-record temperatures. we saw that a year ago. warm temperatures were sitting off the east coast of the u.s. it was a slower-moving storm and is the goal of the moisture, leading to record flooding over a large part of the western
, taking sex slaves. in accordance with u.s. policy, a small team of u.s. troops are currently in the field helping local forces hunt this killer. . they believe an effort to could help bholser their efforts, they are asking for this, they think this can make a difference on the ground. let's answer their call and send this bill to the president for his signature and i thank my colleagues for their support. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves her time they have gentleman from california is recognized. mr. berman: yes, mr. speaker, i have no further requests for time and will yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california yields back. the gentlelady from florida. ms. ros-lehtinen: i also have no further requests for time and i yield back the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass senate 2318. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 -- ms. ros-lehtinen: mr. speaker, i object to the vote on the grounds that a quorum is not present and
of this will be the international ratings will be downgraded for the u.s. we have had one mark down so far. the problem is politics. they are -- it is too broken to address the problem. if we go through the honeymoon period of a new congress and we don't do something substantial, they will say these politicians are too broken to take on these problems. they could give us a substantial downgrade. guest: it is not clear what the right answer is for them. going over the cliff would demonstrate that congress did not blank when they needed to make a substantial reduction in the deficit. would they say not going over the fiscal cliff is a good sign? you should prevent the economic downturn but put in a framework for better growth. when the s&p downgraded last year, -- we are still the most creditworthy countries. guest: we are continuing to look like the best looking worse than the glue factory. --horse in the glue factory. everyone says we are the best and we are fine but all sorts of countries get in trouble. this should not make people feel good about where we are. research success -- suggest we are in the zone where
required on all firearm purchases instead of the fractions of sales that get done today. 408% of u.s. gun sales are by private sellers who are not required to perform background checks. you can be a three-time convicted felon, a serial domestic abuser, severely mentally ill, or even on a terrorist watch list and still go to a gun show or go on the internet and buy whatever gun you want. the american people want to strengthen their bases to prevent the mentally ill from buying gun. but over a million disqualifying mental health records are still missing from states. 10 states have failed to flag a single person as mentally ill. and 17 states list less than 100 people. miles per hour people want to see assault weapons bans reinstated and large capacity ammunition clps banned to keep dangerous ammunition out of the hands of mad men. let's face it. when you put a 30-round clip in an assault weapon, you are not protecting your home. you are not hunting deer, you are hunting people. we have hid from this fight for too long. for too long we have used politics and the second amendment to cover up
is exported all around the world. they want the u.s. economy to be stronger as quickly as possible, because it means there will be able to continue to export. as much as they're trying to move from an export driven economy to a more domestic consumption based economy, they will still rely heavily on exports. the more americans are working, the more money they have in their pockets, the more they will be shopping in stores, and so much of what they buy is made from many other countries, including china. the healthier the u.s. economy is, the more that china will export. that means jobs for the chinese people. >> when you talk to leaders, how much are they actually were it about united states? -- worried about united states? >> i think united states is incredibly important to china, and recognize that. not only in very practical ways, but in another way, more psychological. there is a 150 year history were china has been trying to check itself up in big shin itself upr status. there is this lingering psychological mindset of china being victimized by the great powers. it is kind of a struggle
. obama welcome to military families to the white house for this season's first u.s. of holiday decorations. the theme is the way to all. the white house christmas tree is decorated by children living on u.s. military bases around the world. the first lady's remarks are about 15 minutes. > [applause] >> hi, everyone. welcome to the white house. prequel, hu? yeah. let me start by thanking jennifer for that lovely introduction and to welcome her family here as well. her father and her husband. we are so grateful for your service and glad you could be here. thank you, jennifer, for everything that you and your family have done for this country and what you have done to make this house as beautiful as it is. as first lady, you know that i have had the privilege of traveling across this country. one of the best things i get to do is to meet with all of the wonderful military families, like jennifer's family and your families. it is an honor to host you all here today at the white house. yeah. the cool house. i like it. i have said this many times before. i will say it again because i
and one of the underserved policy topics in the united states. the native-born population of the u.s. doesn't have replacement fertility rates so all future population growths comes from what we choose and this is the issue over the longer term, so those things strike me as central as to how it will work out. seems to me we have a couple things. first is to recognize it is time to look forward. this crisis began years ago now, and i was once in the camp of designing very clever policies, i promise you they were very clever. al solved all these problems, but more policy and inknow vacation and programs and intervention i think is now making it too difficult to figure out what the rules are and move forward. more policy innovation. that is making it difficult to figure out what the rules are. it is time to let markets clear. that's point number one. the example is the basil three zero courts and the implementation. if you look at the credit implications of those rules verses normal lending circa 2001. we're on track to thrive for 25% fewer mortgages then if we have the standard for 200
was first elected to the u.s. house in 2010. this is about 35 minutes. >> good morning and it is a great day in south carolina. it's a historic day in south carolina, because, you know, first of all, we all were saddened and surprised when senator demint told us that he was not going to continue in the u.s. senate. but i will tell you, as i've told many people, that the heritage foundation is blessed. he will lift them up to an amazing new level. it's a foundation that i have always had great respect for, and they could not have made a more perfect pick. in this decision and process that we went through, there is no replacing jim demint, there is no replacing him. there is no one that can fill his shoes. there is no one that can really carry on that torch. and i don't -- i think that says a lot about him. i think it says a lot about how he has changed the face of south carolina in the way that we have a lot to be proud of. but i also think this is a new day. and it is with great pleasure that i am announcing that i am appointing our next u.s. senator to be congressman, tim scott. [applause]
in the region, the regional leaders, people inside syria who are calling for more u.s. involvement and activity. there's an expectation that after the election the obama administration would take the wondering- we're all and waiting to see what is going to be. >> thanks to both of you for your questions. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> if you work for them, you get a mercurial, sometimes j generous, almost cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. men of his age and class are not going to apologize to a young secretary our typist. he had a way of turning the tables. his version of apology would be to say, i am a kind man and you're doing a good job today. the issue is never settled. he always had to get the last word in. one night going through white hall, a german bomb fell nearby. his bodyguard pushed him into a doorway. a couple of thompson's men were slightly wounded. churchill did not like to be touched. he said, thompson, do not do that. tonight, and extended 90 minute q&a with paul reid. "the last lio
was the longest u.s. serving member. he was elected to the house of representatives in 1952 and the u.s. senate in 1958. two former staffers, ira schapiro and david corbin, talked about the senator's life. next on c-span, nikki haley. >> the first speaker is irish schapiro. -- ira shapiro. he played important roles in foreign intelligence surveillance and the completing of the metrorail system. during the clinton administration, it he served as a leading u.s. trader and .arned the rank of staff thaman he was described as antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. se
powerful machines and he wins every election. he gets to the u.s. senate, he climbs the leadership ladder and defeats prominent liberal senators. he selected the senate whip by ousting ted kennedy. he defeated former vice president of the united states, hubert. it is always a fight for byrd. had to fight for everything he got for west virginia. he had to fight. the trouble is, what direction to take the book in? how to convey these two objectives? it came to me while sitting on the senate floor when he delivered his speech. to celebrate his 50 years of senate and the u.s. senate. the floor staff asked us to wait a few minutes since the senators were on their way there. they wanted to hear byrd talk. we discussed these incidents. he kept relating to the presidency. i worked with this president. he worked with jimmy carter. it started dawning on me -- the presidents. after the speech, it dawned on me -- no other person in american history has had an impact on so many presidential administrations. he has impacted 11 presidents. and that is 1/4 of presidents in american history. i could achie
ago there were only 1 billion active participants in the global economy. it was really just the u.s., western europe, and japan. today there are 4 billion people participating in the economy. we have got the same antiquated tax system today that we had 20 years ago. we should be taking the opportunity there to look this thing and say, what does it take to be globally competitive today? yes, i was on the commission, and some might think i like that proposal a lot, which i did. it does not have to be exactly like that, but there are some principles that are a part. -- that are important in there. the whole idea of during individual corporate cap gains, do it all at the same time make sense. the territorial system for companies makes sense, with clauses so that nothing -- nothing screwy happens. then we relook at all these deductions, and we should be looking at do we want all these at a time when our economy needs more flexibility to respond to a very globally different place than we had 20 years ago. it is -- to pass up this -- i think it a shame to pass up this opportunity to actual
it is embarrassing to compared government funding for amtrak with u.s. government funding for domestic aviation and highway speed passenger >> to build and maintain one of the best highways systems in the world, we've spent $114 billion and built it over 45 years and today it would be $126 billion. con jex on our roads are at historic levels and by 2020 urban interstates will be at or over capacity. and anyone who has had the pleasure of flying recently they know the problems that plag our nation's airport ch airports, in fact, in spite of all this amtrak carries more riders from new york to boston than all other airlines put together. 50% of people that travel this distance. and between washington d.c. and new york city, amtrak carries twice as many passengers as all airlines come bind. today it carries 75% of inner city travel letters between new york and washington. amtrak has done all this with the threat of funding cuts and privatization especially of the profitable northeast corridor hanging over its head. we know that in other parts of the world privatization of hig
will push for stronger gun control laws. question for you is and should u.s. gun laws change? here are the numbers to call -- you can also find us online. send us a tweet or join the conversation on facebook, or send us an e-mail. our question for you is whether u.s. gun laws should change? here's the headline in "usa today" -- jumping down into the story, it says -- others are exploring the question of gun laws. we will hear some comments from members of congress this morning. congressional democrats are vowing to push for stricter gun control laws. several democratic lawmakers called yesterday for a new push for gun restrictions, including a ban on military-style assault weapons in the wake of the connecticut massacre. democratic senator dianne feinstein is the author of an assault weapons ban that lapsed in 2004. she said she would introduce new legislation soon. senator dick durbin said that lawmakers will hold hearings on gun-control and several others said they would devote attention to the issue. president obama says action is needed. "ere's the store in "usa today -- and th
minutes that legislators have been mentioned and people have mentioned various talk show host. u.s. a call at 202-585-3881 for republicans -- give us a call. 202-585-3880 for democrats. you can send us a tweet, twitter.com/cspanwj. facebook, as well, facebook.com/cspan. journal@c-span.org. this is lee in wyoming. host: give us a call and let us know who your political hero is. the story after the new ttown shooting. this is the front page of "the new york times." host: the story goes on. this is luke rosak. host: it goes on to talk about that story. front page of "the new york daily news." this stemming from upstate new york about a sniper that set fire to a building and goes on to shoot two firemen as they were trying to take care of the fire. eric from pittsburgh, pennsylvania on the democrat's line. good morning. caller: michael moore. host: i'm sorry? caller: michael moore. capitalism is dead. host: george, good morning. caller: good morning. george will. he is not an office holder and has no intention of running for public office. he gave a lecture in st. louis on december 4 and it wa
to avoid a downgrade in the u.s. treasury debt, we need something lows to fiscal sustainability. we need to get to $3 trillion. if we fall short of that, that is a problem. >> ok. you brought up social security. to't we need more reforms make that more solvent? if we were to embark on that and set up a commission, i think there is a lot of talk of ok, we should do that. >> i think that is a perfectly reasonable way to do it. >> my colleagues said that in the near term he would rather see rates go up on the wealthiest americans because he believes it gives us a greater long-term chance to reform the tax code. do you agree with this assessment? also, do you think this is awise course? i support going back to the clinton levels. do you agree? we should look at raising taxes on the wealthiest rather than just -- >> i think we need to do both. if you are going down my path, we need both. there is no way to get to that number with tax reform alone. if you consider we will not take away a charitable deduction and if your goal is not to raise taxes from lower and middle-income houses. there is
they are investing from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all
: they began receiving funds. as a result the number of pediatricians in the u.s. has grown steadily. today over 40% of the pediatricians and pediatric specialists are trained in the 57 free-standing children's hospitals that receive this funding. a proven track record. we need to get it done and again i congratulate the members on the floor today for getting this bill to hopefully to the president's desk before the year is out. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: thank you, madam speaker. i'd like to yield now to the gentlewoman from california who's the democratic sponsor of the house national pediatric research network act of 2012, which is the second title of the legislation before us, mrs. capps. the speaker pro tempore: for how much time does the gentleman yield? mr. pallone: such time as she may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. mrs. capps: i want to acknowledge being in the chair as my friend. madam speaker, i rise in strong support of the preemie re
the necessary paperwork. he talked to u.s. customs and verified with them that the gun did not violate any mexican law. the two allegedly handed the mexican officials the paperwork regarding the rifle, but instead of continuing on their way to costa rica to go surfing, hammer was immediately detavend, dragged away to -- detained, dragged away to a notorious jail in matamoros, mexico, where they jail narcoterrorists. this is a picture of the marine when he served america. this is a picture recently taken in the matamoros prison. as you can see he's in solitary confinement and like back in the old days chained to his bed because so he won't go anywhere all because of a mixup of what the law is and what should have happened to him at the border. so he's being held as a criminal because the size of the barrel of that rifle was apparently too long. even though u.s. customs told him he was not violating any mexican or american law in having the rifle. hammer had no criminal intent when he took that old rifle into mexico. john hammer should not have to spend another holiday away from his family.
revolution was concern to the united states. egypt has long held incredible importance to u.s. policy in the middle east. the u.s. reaction to that revolution was unclear. there were some that said this was a good thing that this would only lead to democracy. there were others who insisted that mubarak was not a dictator, which might be an insult to dictators if he spent 30 years securing that grip on power. the revolution in egypt has taken many turns. the muslim brotherhood has come to power through the ballot box but has been marred thanks to edicts by morsi. earning him the title of morsilini. or mubarak with a beard. revolution is going. syria is teetering, jordan is burning and the future is yet to be written. the question, will there be elections, will islamists win, will it be one man one vote or one man, one vote, one time. with that, we are going to debate the motion, if democracy is going to triumph are victories at the ballot box unavoidable. we will have opening remarks from our panelists. from there, we will have some question and answers from myself and the audience and
have that in u.s. hands -- i would rather have that in u.s. hands. >> i think george washington summed it up best. keep strong american borders and stay out of other countries squabbles. what ever happened to our christian ethics and foundation? >> the biggest change in american foreign-policy since the republic was founded was the creation of nato in 1947. it was the point in time the united states said they would engage in other countries in our national interest. the previous 165 years of american history avoided those kinds of commitments. you can make your own decisions if it was smart. i think it was wise myself. it was a significant change in the orientation of american international engagements. that has been true since 1947. 65 years we have been engaged that involve the united states and the global leadership position. we want to leave or doing what to stay or do we want to alter? those are the decisions of the obama administration would face. when you do not have the kind of resources that allow you to do everything you want to do in commit to every engagement, what are the
reports that there are 264,000 -- rifles manufactured each year in the u.s. and of those a 5,443 are exported overseas and 248,000 are used right here in the u.s. a bitter irony that we are confronted with at sandy hook is that the firearm industry's association their headquarters are located just across the highway from the sandy hook elementary school and while focusing on large capacity weapons is important, i also have a bill, hr 66 a. legislation aimed at establishing a nationwide system for prohibiting unlicensed gun ownership and granting the u.s. attorney general broader authority on the program. as sad as the sandy hook incident is for all of us, we must be cognizant of the fact that gun violence has been terrorizing neighborhoods in chicago, detroit, houston, washington washington, d.c. for over decades now. one of my local newspapers, the "chicago tribune," reports that at the end of march, murders in my city had spiked almost 60%. and as of june, homicides in chicago were up almost 20% over last year. 488 murders to date. ranging from 18 months to 19 years. these
but a conscious choice. in shaping the international environment for space activity, the u.s. should build a more prosperous world in which our values are taken beyond. we should also exercise some humility in facing the unknown. in their time these projects were controversial and criticized. who today would have said they should not have been done? we have seen these efforts to define us as a nation who pioneers the next frontier. we are all in this together, white house, congress, international partners and many u.s. companies that operate the capabilities. in think this committee for holding this hearing today. i will be happy to answer any questions you might have. >> thank you. i think all of you for your testimony. the committee limits questioning to five minutes for each of us. i will open a round of question. i do not ever like to say this is my last day. i do not anything last. i do not even like them to call an airport a terminal. i am thinking of the wonderful testimony you have given in the time it took you to get that ensued deliver it to us. it is great and generous. i glean from ea
legislation he's sponsoring which will allow more highly skilled immigrants the u.s. that's live at 7:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> i think riders institute is something that's important within the culture. we are a culture of words of voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page of writing but i think that there is no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps film. but there is something in literature that cap chures the hunal spirit. >> this weekend join book tv as we look tpwhind scenes at the literary life of new york's capital city albany. >> senators from new york and new jersey say hurricane sandy caused $5 billion worth of damage to rail subway and port infrastructure in their state. they testified on surface transportation yesterday. >> i call this hearing to order. thank you for joining us, mr. secretary. i asked you to testify today because i'm deeply concerned about the recent report that the f.h.a. could potentially need taxpayer support for the first time in its 78-year histo
is not that great. >> you start off your book by saying you want to copy the u.s. grant memoirs, a two volume set. then yours became more emotional than his. how many you did one volume and how many emotional? >> i will tell you why. first of all, grant is an interesting character. he refused to write his memoirs for years and years. finally he went bankrupt once again and found out he was dying and it kind of happened at the same time. he tells us at the front of the memoirs the only reason i'm writing this is because i went bankrupt again and i want to leave an estate for my family and they are offering me money. he is up front about it. >> when did you like him? >> he was a dirty boot soldier. >> when was he a soldier? >> he was a soldier long before the -- long before he was known to the american people as the leader of the union army. he was out doing great things. grant is interesting. he was a success awful a soldier then a failure as a soldier then he was a success at a businessman. he hung in there. he was one of the most effective -- without a lot of press coverage and that sort of thin
, where it fell. at no time were the missiles a threat towards america. on the international front, the u.s. moves to shore up syrian opposition groups. the obama administration has designated a group there a terrorist organization and will collectively recognize the coalition of syrian groups as legitimate representatives of the country. this is information that we learned from an interview that president obama did with abc news. in line with that, the u.s. will formally recognize the opposition council as the leader of the syrian people. officials say that the u.s. afghan force may total 9000 after the year 2014. the obama administration plans to keep between 6009 thousand troops in afghanistan after 2014 and they will confine most of them to fortified garrisons near the capital, leaving afghan troops largely without american the advisers in the field. another story from afghanistan -- "slow gains in justice for females." women who are victims of violence often report abuse that -- rarely report abuses to government authorities and rarely see their cases go to trial." that is a story in "
, a discussion on the impact of skilled immigrant labor on the u.s. economy. at 11:00 q&a with crystal wright. there is another chance to see david cameron take questions from the house of commons. >> i don't mean just the channel but the able to find surprises. every month or every year i get some show that people are talking about that i don't think you can have imagined choosing. you could not convince me to choose honey boo boo. or a certain food channel networks. i don't think if i had to predetermine that was my preference i would have ever picked them. but the ability to stumble on them, to hear people talk about them and let me go into an environment and suddenly find i like honey boo boo and i'm watching its. i think that is a huge part of the experience and i think it is sold short. i still think a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escapism and being able to roam around the tv jungle finding things they did not know were there. >> ice -- i think people still love discovery. every month or every year, i hear some show people are suddenly talking about that i do not think you cou
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